Self-Compassion

“Compassion literally means “to suffer together.” Among emotion researchers, it is defined as the feeling that arises when you are confronted with another’s suffering and feel motivated to relieve that suffering.” Self-compassion is then the feeling that arises when we notice our own suffering AND we want to do something to alleviate this suffering.

Self-talk has a powerful impact on our wellbeing. Critical self-talk can lead to more suffering, increased stress and unhappiness. Kinder self-talk can lead to less suffering, more calm and contentment. There are two programs (described below) that offers strategies to decrease volume of our inner critic and increase volume of our compassionate voice. Speaking to ourselves in a more compassionate way leads to a healthier attitude on life and outlook of ourselves.


Mindful Self-Compassion for Teens (MSC-Teens)

MSC-Teens (formerly known as Making Friends with Yourself) is a self-compassion program for teens ages 11 to 13, and ages 14 to 18. Topics include:

  1. Role of inner critic,
  2. Getting in touch with your compassionate voice,
  3. Why self-compassion is more reliable than self-esteem,
  4. The cost of social comparison.

All teens co-create a space in which we explore these and other topics through exercises, videos, discussions, meditations, and movement practices. This eight week program meets for 1 1/2 hours each week.

Check here for current class offering.


Mindful Self-Compassion (MSC)

MSC is a self-compassion program for adults. Topics explored include:

  1. Why mindfulness is the foundational skill,
  2. Getting in touch with your compassionate voice,
  3. Being with difficult emotions,
  4. Role of self-compassion in challenging relationships.

All participants co-create a space in which we explore these and other topics through exercises, videos, discussions, meditations, and movement practices. This eight week program meets for 2 1/2 hours each week and includes an additional half day silent retreat.